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What it means to waive vaccine patent rights

Hello,

Welcome to Insider Healthcare. I'm Shelby Livingston, and I cover how healthcare is paid for and delivered in the US for the Insider healthcare team. Today in healthcare news:

The Biden administration wants to waive coronavirus vaccine patent rights, but experts say the move isn't likely to boost vaccine production;COVID-19 booster shots probably won't cause worse side effects than the original vaccines;What parents and teens need to know about the COVID-19 vaccine.

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Boxes containing the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine are prepared to be shipped at the McKesson distribution center in Olive Branch, Mississippi, on December 20, 2020.

Global leaders want to override COVID-19 vaccine patents to boost production. It probably isn't going to work.

The Biden administration has thrown its support behind an effort to waive coronavirus vaccine patent rights.The hope is that it will allow other companies to make their own versions of established COVID-19 vaccines. But many of the tricks to making Pfizer and Moderna's vaccines aren't found in patents, experts say.

Catch up on the latest here>>


vaccine selfie colorado

Booster shots of COVID-19 vaccine probably won't cause worse side effects than the original vaccines, experts predict

COVID-19 boosters are expected later this year.It's too early to say for sure what side effects to expect.But experts predict they won't be much worse than the original COVID-19 vaccines.

Read the full story>>


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Junior Molly Day gets her first Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine at Ridley High School in Pennsylvania on May, 3, 2021 as part of a clinic for students age 16-18.

What teenagers and parents need to know about the COVID-19 vaccine, from side effects to dosing, according to experts

Kids aged 12 to 15 may be able to get their COVID-19 vaccines as early as next week.Young people have robust immune systems, so teens should prepare for side effects.If your child wants to return to school, play sports, and see their friends, get ready to book their shot.

Find out more>>

More stories we're reading today:

People are getting 'COVID nails,' and one expert says the unusual lines could be as useful as an antibody test to prove previous infection (Insider)Covid Testing Has Turned Into a Financial Windfall for Hospitals and Other Providers (Kaiser Health News)Nearly one million people signed up for Obamacare coverage this spring. (The New York Times)When I get slammed with surprise medical bills, a single phone call helps me save hundreds (Insider)Pfizer and BioNTech are filing for full approval of their COVID-19 vaccine with the FDA (Insider)

– Shelby

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Source: What it means to waive vaccine patent rights

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